4 replaced http://serverfault.com/ with https://serverfault.com/
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Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

3 replaced http://meta.serverfault.com/ with https://meta.serverfault.com/
source | link

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find herehere.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

2 added 4 characters in body
source | link

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

Our community isn't a fan of minor edits on Q&A's that have run their course, because this bumps them back to the front page. The definition of "run their course" is subjective, but usually amounts to us rejecting edits that do not substantially improve a Q&A that has been inactive for several months. In particular, if it has been more than a year the odds of community regulars declining an edit increases to nearly 100%.

This echoes a recent meta discussion, which you can find here.

Picking three examples from the top (since you did not provide examples of your own):

I could continue down the list, but I'm reasonably sure that this trend continues and that the mod in question would have been in full-on bulk rejection mode at this point.

1
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