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The FAQ makes it clear that SF is for professional desktop support as well as sysadmin stuff. Seeing this question (just an example, not singling it out) makes me wonder where the line on software should be drawn.

This is the kind of question that frequently come up for those doing desktop support, or those of us who are one-man (person?) IT "departments". I'm borderline on it myself but only because I'd hate to see a great flood of such questions.

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  • The FAQ used to differentiate between a problem on a single computer (as is the case in that Question) and problems that affect multiple computers. I think that one could go either way, but you have a point. – Chris S Dec 15 '11 at 19:30
  • @Chris, that example might not be the best one to illustrate the point. It's just the one that made me think to ask about this as a general thing. – John Gardeniers Dec 15 '11 at 21:23
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Hmmmmm. I tend to judge it based on "If this problem arose with one of our clients, who would be tasked with fixing it". Chances are, if it's something I would find myself needing to fix, I let it be.

However, I'm also a hardarse and have better things to do with my time than figure out how to colour code contact cards, so I would likely tell the user that I can't help them with that particular problem and they will need to just work with the system.

However, if the situation was "It works on standalone Outlook, but as soon as I connect it to our exchange server, it works differently" (such as flags in Outlook 2010 when connected to an Exchange 2003 server), then that's 100% applicable for here.

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