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13

One of the guiding principles for 'what site should I migrate this question to' is, 'keep it where it is, unless it'll get much more love somewhere else.' This very question was brought up many times back when the whole Area51 thing started out. In brief, The Powers That Be are not afraid of overlap. In fact, overlap can be good. Overlap builds (multiple) ...


10

From my own perspective, the breaking up of SF into a bunch of only semi-related sites has dramatically reduced the value I get from SF, which is reflected in my ever decreasing enthusiasm for it. When I first came to SF it covered all the topics I was interested in from the sysadmin perspective (as well as a whole lot more). Now I'd have to troll a number ...


8

The biggest barrier standing in the way is that Gravatar doesn't support HTTPS, and Gravatars are a big part of StackExchange as a whole. There are a variety of other items that are included from 3rd party sites which would also prevent full SSL "green-bar" support. Until such items are fixed or engineered around (such as building an HTTPS-enabled Gravatar ...


6

But everything on StackExchange is publicly searchable and the actual OpenID authentication is secured over TLS - so there would be no point handling regular site traffic securely.


5

Are you supposed to gain reputation per each site Yes.


5

From what I've seen of other questions migrated lately, despite the best of intentions, I can only ask that you don't do it. Very few of them have been even half decent questions and because many (most?) of the posters don't follow the question after the migration the almost obligatory prompts for more (or even relevant) information are to no avail, making ...


5

All the reasons @Chopper3 gave are still valid ones: The actual authentication process is secured over SSL/TLS. (at least if your OpenID provider isn't made of suck) Everything else you do on ServerFault is public* Adding SSL to StackExchange sites is computationally expensive (Good enterprise SSL accelerators range in cost from about as much as a pony to ...


5

Your question has to do with system administration, and is on topic here. I can't say whether you're more likely to get a good answer at Sharepoint, but most of the questions I have seen there are about using it, rather than administering it. You might also want to ask about the question on their site meta.


4

tldr; some sub-sites are justified, others are just a pain. I believe so, especially when you consider that revenue is generated via ads, and the more visits to a single SE site the better. I tried to get the good folks over at RPi.SE to see that their questions fit happily inside of a linux SE and a Embedded electronics site such as that proposal I just ...


4

It seems that this only affects Google Chrome beta (Version 30.0), it isn't a problem with Stack Exchange.


4

On the one had, I agree that there are too many overlapping sites, but that's the SE business model, so there's not much that can be done about it. I don't follow Security.SE or Linux or Webmasters, and I'm sure there are some questions on those sites that I'd be interested in, but I don't have time to be active on those sites. OTOH, it doesn't seem to be ...


3

The funny thing is that now a proper SSL certificate is installed, the problem is that it only has names stackexchange.com and *.stackexchange.com. It should be simple to get serverfault.com, stackoverflow.com, etc added as alternative names. Update: but most still redirect to http, except for stackexchange.com itself.


3

Maybe I'm not as paranoid as some but I just don't see the need for a secure connection to a site like SF. If you have a real concern about someone impersonating you then perhaps you need to address the underlying problem instead.


3

Related discussion, though the OP is a bit of a .. pill .. so you'll have to filter the content a bit. Why doesn't the Stack Overflow team fix the Firesheep style cookie theft?


3

I agree with SysAdmin1138's post. And to specifically address your concerns: They can post the Question on any site and it should be migrated to the correct site. Perhaps this should be more clear in the Question Asking page; and it should be reinforced to the community to migrate appropriately if it's a decent question (obviously crap should be closed). ...


3

Declining as we only support Google v31+ (I know it wasn't the case before, but it's not worth fixing it now).


3

If you would like to code your own solution to the problems posted, you are welcome to do so. To post it here, simply explain that you coded something, link to it, and most importantly explain how the code solves the problem. We welcome links to your github (or any other repository), but make sure that the Answer you post here contains a whole answer to the ...


3

I think sysadmin1138 and Gilles have this question pretty much nailed down... So I'm just going to address this: Which site should I post to? There's an old blog post on this... Is it really so hard to figure out which community you belong to, and thus, where your question belongs? Ask yourself this: what is your job title? which community ...


3

They are not subcommunities. They are partially intersecting communities. Many of the questions on Database administrators are firmly on the database side, involving no administration at the system level. Most questions on Webmasters involve the page contents, not the administration of the servers. Many of the questions on IT Security are not about system ...


2

The only area I know of where your aggregate reputation has meaning is in Area51 when it comes time to commit to new proposals. The more rep you have across the entire StackExchange, the more weight your committment has to that proposal.


1

Can someone either explain how this is a good idea? Joel Spolsky did this blog post which I would roughly sum up as "because people are pettifogging separatists and you can't change them". Of course there are legitimate reasons for forking - especially if you consider that a site's reputation is not just a number. But I agree with you that the current ...


1

Well, basically these sites come to be because of Area 51. This is where new Stack Exchange sites are proposed, and they get more people committing to them, until eventually it reaches enough to have a beta, then a full site. You can see a full list of those that have been launched. Is this a good idea? I do not think so. This is just my opinion. I feel the ...


1

The context of the question is important. If you substitute your-tag for rsync in this question and it's answers then you should get a feel for what goes where. There is though considerable overlap. Unix and Linux was launched from beta some time ago.


1

Your perogative really. If you want to flag them on the other sites as "belongs on SF", then it's up to the mods of the other sites to decide if they want to move them. Generally we tend to avoid migrating old questions (say, 12 months or older), or questions that are just crappy questions that would likely be closed on SF once they're migrated.


1

So, fast forward to 2014, Stackexchange can now be accessed via https (Yay! And rightly so: Wikipedia is "public" too, still I don't want my employer/wifi sponsor/isp/... to eavesdrop on the connection) - but only with mixed content (Imgur? Quantcast?) and with TLS 1.0 only. Are there any plans to fix this as well?


1

An SSL certificate is important when the StackExchange API is used with JavaScript. Any website that wants to display items relevant to user private data, on a page protected with SSL will show errors about unsecure content. And as Yuhong Bao mentioned, https://www.serverfault.com does have a cerificate, but that certificate is invalid as it only covers *....


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